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Mining Matters



IF IT'S NOT GROWN, IT'S MINED. 

Does mining matter in your life? From makeup to toothpaste to cars and golf clubs, minerals are found in the products you use every day.

 

WHAT MINERALS ARE MINED IN COLORADO?

Coal—Our Most Abundant Energy Resource. Coal is the most widely used, cost effective source of electricity. It supplies more than 60% of Colorado’s electricity needs.

 

Gold—Not Just for Jewelry. Gold is used in dentistry, medicine, mobile phones, computers and, scientific and electronic instruments.

 

Gypsum—Think Wallboard. Used in prefabricated wallboard, industrial and building plaster, and cements.

 

Limestone—Sidewalks, Bridges and Buildings—Colorado limestone is used in the manufacture of concrete for sidewalks, bridges, and more durable buildings and structures.

 

Molybdenum—For Your Car and A Whole Lot More. Used in alloy steels to make automotive parts, as a high-grade lubricant and has important environmental and safety applications.

 

Sodium bicarbonate—The “Green” Mineral. Sodium bicarbonate (Nahcolite) is used in baking soda, toothpaste, food products, animal feed and to reduce power plant emissions.

 
 

 

PROVIDING 57,000 JOBS FOR COLORADO

A report by the National Mining Association shows the mining industry in Colorado employs nearly 18,000 people directly and accounts for more than 57,000 jobs overall. Employees in the mining industry are some of the highest paid industrial workers in the state; and in most cases, the mining companies are the largest employers in the communities in which they operate.


$7 BILLION IN VALUE FOR COLORADO

Colorado’s mining industry generates more than $7 billion toward Colorado’s Gross Domestic Product. Colorado ranks 4th among the states in mineral royalty disbursements; in 2012, Colorado received $157 million in coal, other mineral, and oil and gas production royalties, half of which fund public schools. Mineral severance taxes support local governments and important state programs such as geologic hazard detection, and avalanche prediction and prevention.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP

Modern mining activity affects less than 1 percent of the land surface in Colorado, and mining companies spend millions of dollars each year to reclaim mine land and protect the environment.

 

In 2003, the Colorado Mining Association launched the first ever program for Pollution Prevention and Best Management Practices for the mining industry and received a Friend of the EPA Award.

 

Uranium—Nuclear Energy. Used in the production of clean, emission-free nuclear energy, which accounts for 20% of the electricity generated in the US.

 

more Calendar

11/30/2017
Coal, Hardrock and Uranium Committee Meeting

12/12/2017
St. Barbara's Day Award Luncheon

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