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Rock & Coal Archive


Rock and Coal Archive: 2018

 

October 2018

Legislative News

Everyone seems to be holding their breath until the November 6 election. Plans for the 2019 General Assembly, both for legislators and interest groups, hinge on which party will control the State Senate and the Governor’s office, as well as which legislators will be available to sponsor various bills. Committee chairs are determined by the majority party, as are the number of seats held by the respective parties. For example, if the Democrats win control of the Senate then their members will hold the chairmanship and the majority of seats on the Agriculture and Natural Resources committee which hears all bills dealing with mining.  Anti-mining bills which passed the House last year but were killed by the Republican controlled Senate committee could face a much brighter future depending on November 6.  Recently, the interim Water Resources Review Committee saw a redraft of HB 18-1301 (last session’s ban of self-bonding for hardrock mines) withdrawn by its sponsor in the face of insufficient votes to move it forward, no doubt holding off for a more favorable outcome in January.

Some stakeholder groups inch forward—others on hold
CMA continues to meet with other industry representatives and the Air Pollution Control Division looking for measures to increase efficiency in the permitting process. Industry hopes that if such efficiencies can be identified and implemented, the recent fee increases will not need to be repeated for several years. Those increases, authorized by the legislature in 2018, are being adopted through Air Commission Regulation 3 at a hearing on October 18. A list of recommendations has been evaluated and ranked by the multiple industry organizations and will be compared against a similar evaluation conducted by the Air Division in a meeting set for November 5. In the meantime, the two groups continue discussions on a bi-weekly basis with follow-up calls among CMA members on the day following those meetings. For further information regarding the calls, contact the CMA office at (303) 575-9199 and check with Allison.
Stakeholder meetings to discuss the development of a TENORM regulation, on the other hand, have been placed on hold until completion of a contractor’s draft report. Several groups, including CMA, were concerned that decisions were being made too quickly for adequate stakeholder review and response and urged a revised meeting schedule. CDPHE responded by halting all currently scheduled meetings. There are many uncertainties in the information we have seen to date. While mining waste rock and soils are outside the purview of contemplated rules, it is unclear what other materials might fall within the scope requiring regulated disposal.

 

 

CMA Committee Updates 

Coal, Hardrock and Uranium Committee

Office of Surface Mining and Enforcement, Western Region
Dave Berry, Regional Director of the Office of Surface Mining and Enforcement, Western Region, updated the committee about his agency’s focus on the overall Department of Interior reorganization efforts.  At this time, the reorganization will create six regions in the western region of coordinated agency efforts, and 12 regions nationwide. The Department’s first reorganization efforts were criticized by western governors and the Department has listened to those issues. 
 
Berry expressed strong support for President Trump’s Administration efforts to streamline permitting of activities on federal lands and efforts to strengthen relationships between federal regulatory agencies such as OSM and state partners such as DRMS.

 

Committee members posed a number of questions as well as offering commendation for efforts by the agency to its approach in handling a number of issues. The committee also discussed the agency’s implementation of recent changes to the Reclamation Cost Estimates which the agency is phasing in on lands the agency has jurisdiction on reflecting changes to equipment use hours.

CMA appreciates David’s appearance at the committee meeting.

Division of Reclamation, Mining and Safety
Michael Cunningham presented the minerals program update beginning with the agency’s review of draft legislation changing hardrock reclamation permitting debated last legislative session that will be discussed at the September 27, 2018 legislative Water Resources Interim Committee. Last year’s bill sponsor, Representative Dylan Roberts (D), intends to ask the Committee to adopt the bill as a part of the Committee’s package of bills. CMA is reviewing the bill, which appears to be similar to last year’s House Bill 1301. There are several changes that we are analyzing.  If the bill is not adopted as an interim committee bill, we believe the sponsor intends to introduce it in 2019.

Jim Stark, Director of the DRMS Coal Program reported the Mined Land Reclamation Board will hear a presentation on the Reclamation Cost Estimate calculations at its September meeting (delayed until October), and work continues to develop a survey of contractors the Division works with to better understand how many hours equipment is used for the purposes of calculating reclamation cost estimates.


Monthly reports from DRMS are a key component of our Coal, Hardrock and Uranium Committee as members benefit from hearing the latest news from the coal and mineral programs.

Mark Chalmers, CEO of Energy Fuels, who was recently appointed to the CMA Board, reported on his company’s petition that CMA supports asking the United States to investigate the world-wide uranium market as uranium is a critical U.S. mineral for both electric generation and fuel for submarines.

 

Water Quality Committee

CMA’s Water Quality Committee meets monthly at the CMA office. Chaired by Jimmy Boswell of Peabody Energy, the committee has addressed a number of common water quality issues that members face in permitting and enforcement contexts.


Several CMA members met last month with John Swartout, Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper’s Senior Policy Advisor, to express their views on these issues. The following items have been thoroughly discussed with CMA members, and with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s Water Quality Control Division staff. 

  1. Refusal of the WQCD to meet with permittees applying or renewing for water quality permits prior to a draft permit being issued. CMA believes pre-application meetings can benefit both applicants and the Division, and can result in fewer issues that need to be addressed by draft permits.
  2.  Application of permit conditions that have never before been applied in previous permits. For example, several CMA members have been required to comply with water quality standards not at the mine, but downstream of the facility at a point where the standards may be more stringent.
  3. Colorado law clarifies the roles of several state agencies regarding water quality responsibilities. CMA has expressed concerns about the Water Quality Control Division’s overreach into responsibilities for water quality programs administered by the Division of Mining and Safety.


CMA’s Water Quality Committee meets the same day of the Water Quality Forum’s Permit Working Group. The Colorado Water Quality Forum was created in 1992 to provide an opportunity for an ongoing informal dialogue among diverse parties representing a broad spectrum of stakeholder interests in water quality management. Participants include water suppliers, industrial and municipal dischargers, environmental groups, and federal, state, and local governmental agencies. The Permits Implementation Work Group was formed out of the Regulation No. 61 workgroup to understand how regulations, policies, guidance, and standards were applied in permits, and to evaluate whether any change was needed. 

Several CMA members participate in the permit workgroups. We will continue to discuss the work of the Permit Issues Workgroup as an agenda item at each of the monthly meetings of the CMA Water Quality Committee. 

The CMA Water Quality Committee is an excellent way for member companies to become aware of emerging water quality topics. This month, we discussed the Water Quality Control Division’s upcoming 303 (d) Listing Methodology workgroup. This workgroup will provide the forum for the revision of the regulation establishing Colorado’s List of Water-Quality-Limited Segments Requiring Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). This list fulfills Section 303(d) of the federal Clean Water Act, which requires states to submit to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) a list of waters for which technology-based effluent limitations and other required controls aren’t stringent enough to implement water quality standards.

Fred Menzer, CMA’s former Chairman in 2012 and 2016, and a member of the Water Quality Control Commission, has announced he will not apply for a second term. Fred, who retired from the Climax Molybdenum Company in 2016, brought an important perspective to the Commission having worked in a number of capacities in the mining industry. CMA encourages CMA members to consider applying for this seat on the Commission which is appointed by the Governor. 

The Colorado Water Quality Control Commission will hold a Town Hall session on October 9 at 11:30 am during which the public can ask questions or provide feedback to the Commission.  The Town Hall will be held in the Sabin Conference Room at the campus of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, 4300 Cherry Creek Drive South.  

 
Health and Safety Committee

CMA’s Health and Safety Committee met at Trapper Mining in Craig, Colorado on September 6. We are excited to revive this important committee as safety is a high priority in our industry. The meeting was coordinated by board member, Laura Beverage, Vice Chair for Health and Safety. Moving forward the committee will be chaired by Karl Koehler, Stephen Laramore and Trent Peterson.

The committee discussed the following agenda items:

A workshop held in Denver September 10-11 by the Mine Safety and Health Research Advisory Committee to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health that advises NIOSH's Office of Mine Safety and Health Research.

The goals of the workshop were to ascertain the safety and health-related issues around emerging technologies, specifically automation in the metals mining industry. Three questions were posed in a series of panel discussions designed to allow for considerable audience interaction:

  1. To what extent will automation and smart technologies be implemented in metal mining and in what time frame?
  2. What are the related emerging health and safety concerns?
  3. What gaps exist in occupational health and safety research related to automation and smart technologies?

Secondly, the committee discussed Executive Order 13777, which is intended to alleviate unnecessary regulatory burdens placed on the American people. MSHA has requested stakeholders’ assistance in identifying those regulations that could be repealed, replaced or modified without reducing miners’ safety or health. CMA is soliciting member comments on this Executive Order, particularly identifying regulations CMA would support repealing. If you have suggestions, please send them to CMA along with reasons why the agency should repeal the regulation.

Other items discussed included finding a way to develop a more up-to-date study guide and questions for the Colorado State Blasters examination, and convening a meeting of regional mining health and safety professionals to discuss issues.


Committee members expressed an interest in CMA hosting informal regional meetings of member companies that would include operators from Rocky Mountain states.


The next meeting of the CMA Health and Safety Committee will be on October 18 in Denver at the CMA office at 3:00 pm. The committee meets quarterly and our agenda will include an allotment of time at each meeting to facilitate discussion of health and safety topics between member companies. 

 

It’s time to renew your CMA membership!

Thank you for your continued investment with the Colorado Mining Association. Without your loyalty and support, we would not be able to continuously provide our members with valuable benefits and actively support the mining industry in Colorado. Put simply, you make what we do possible.

Review CMA's NEW membership categories and pricing and renew your membership today!

 

Colorado Mining Association Education Foundation (CMAEF) Presents to MMSA Denver Chapter 

CMAEF’s course coordinator, Shannon Mann, will be presenting at the monthly lunch meeting of the MMSA (Mining & Metallurgical Society of America), Denver chapter, on October 12.  

This will be a presentation about the teachers that participated in CMAEF’s 2018 summer course, All About Mining—21st Century Mining for K-12 Educators. Shannon will talk about the diversity of these teachers, and how their participation in the course changed their preconceived ideas of the mining industry. In most cases, the teachers reported that the course had a tremendously positive impact on their attitudes and perceptions about mining.

The Colorado Mining Association Education Foundation is always looking to recruit professionals to interact with the teachers/students that take the class.  Would this be something you would like to participate in? Please contact Shannon Mann at coordinator@allaboutmining.org.
 

Upcoming Events

October 18, 2018
Water Quality Committee Meeting
9:00am-10:00am | CMA Office (suite 860)
RSVP (Members Only)
 
October 18, 2018
Coal, Hardrock and Uranium Committee Meeting
10:30am-12:30pm | CMA Office (suite 860)
RSVP (Members Only)
 
October 18, 2018
Health and Safety Committee Meeting
3:00pm-4:00pm | CMA Office (suite 860)
RSVP (Members Only)
 
October 19, 2018
Board of Directors Meeting
9:00am-12:00pm | CMA Office (suite 860)

December 11, 2018
St. Barbara's Day Award Luncheon
11:30am-1:30pm |  The University Club of Denver
Register Now

 

February 24-27, 2019
2019 SME Annual Conference & Expo and CMA 121st National Western Mining Conference 
Registration is now open!
www.smeannualconference.com

 

Welcome New Members!

Hanna Augustynowiz, ifm Efector Inc.
Amy Campbell, Alexco Water & Environment Inc.
Jayne Dore, Flexco
 

CMA Career Center

Connecting highly qualified mining talent with career opportunities!


CMA is proud to announce our new Career Center—the premier resource to connect career opportunities with highly qualified mining talent. To access the CMA Career Center, visit here. 

 

Manage Your Career:

  • Search and apply to the best mining jobs at institutions that value your credentials
  • Upload your anonymous resume so employers can contact you, but you maintain control of your information and choose to whom you release your information.
  • Receive an alert every time a job becomes available that matches your personal profile, skills, interests, and preferred location(s).
  • Access career resources and job searching tips and tools. 

Recruit for Open Positions:

  • Post jobs where the most qualified mining professionals will find and apply to them.
  • Email your jobs directly to CMA job seekers via our exclusive Job Flash email.
  • Search the resume database and contact qualified candidates proactively.
 

 

Questions? Feedback? If you need assistance about this service call us at 860-437-5700 or email customer service.

 

Advertise in CMA’s Rock & Coal Newsletter

Rock & Coal provides the latest mining industry news to the region’s mining operators and suppliers. The monthly e-newsletter provides access to decision-makers and senior executives who rely on industry trends and timely news to make smart decisions.


Highly Engaged Audience
As the industry’s advocate before state and federal legislatures, regulatory agencies and the media on matters critical to the health of the industry, CMA utilizes Rock & Coal to get the message out about the latest legal and policy issues. The newsletter is also the premier source of news and updates on member organizations and CMA activities and events. 

Measurable Performance
Advertising in Rock & Coal provides measurable tracking information. We’ll let you know how many people (and who) saw your ad and clicked on your link so you know exactly how much exposure you’re getting.

 

September 2018

Legislative Update

August 6 was the deadline for several ballot initiatives to submit petition signatures in order to qualify for the November ballot.  Seven were turned in, including two competing proposals to fund transportation, and an oil/gas setback requirement of 2500 feet,    In addition, a broadly worded measure on compensation for lowering the fair market value of private property rights was turned in August 3 and a tax increase for public education was submitted on August 11. The Secretary of State’s office has 30 days from the date of submittal to review the signatures

to determine sufficiency.  In addition to any initiatives that may appear on the ballot, several measures referred by the legislature will appear: 

 

Amendment X – defines Industrial Hemp to be the same as that in federal law, or as defined in state statute (currently it is in the state constitution which makes it difficult to change when federal law changes). 

 

Amendment V – lowers the age for an individual to serve in the state legislature from 25 years of age to 21. 

 

Amendment Y – changes the process for redrawing congressional districts in the state. 

 

Amendment Z – changes the manner in which legislative districts are reapportioned. 

 

Stakeholder Groups

Air Fee Discussions. A stakeholder group created under HB 18-1400 has met twice to discuss issues concerning practices and procedures of the Air Pollution Control Division.  Those meetings have focused primarily on identifying issues for discussion and the level of detail that should be included.   To date, there is some frustration among industry participants that there has been insufficient information about current practices at the division to understand where efficiencies may be found.  Concern over new permit requirements and changing standards for permit renewals (thus leading to lengthier permit reviews) elicited the comment “We encourage our engineers to look for things that might have been overlooked in previous reviews”.  The group will meet again on August 13 at which time the division will present information on its current practices and industry will respond regarding the scope and detail of the stakeholder review.   

TENORM Regulations.  A stakeholder process initiated pursuant to SB 18-045 held its first meeting July 11, with future meetings put on hold until a consultant could be hired by the CDPHE.  The consultant will, among other things, prepare a report to the legislature on the stakeholder process itself as rules are developed.  The report must be presented to the legislature by December 31,  2019 and regulations must be adopted by December 31, 2020.  Currently the department is accepting comments until October 31 concerning the topics and scope of the process.  CMA is most concerned that current definitions and practices to assure that TENORM regulations do not cover NORM (naturally occurring radioactive materials) or “rocks and dirt”.  These materials are, when the level of radiation is sufficiently high, are already covered under the radiation control act.  CMA plans to develop comments with the assistance of its members.

Water Fee Discussions. The Water Quality Control Division has considered permittee feedback on its first annual report and has responded to stakeholder feedback.  Division staff reported to the Water Resources Review Committee on June 19 and discussed stakeholder feedback again before the legislative committee on August 7, as well as responding to questions posed by legislators at the previous meeting. 

Legislative Interim Committees and 2019

Legislative Interim Committees (Water Resources, Wildfire, Transportation Legislation and others) face earlier dates for requesting draft bills due to the requirement for not only draft legislative language but a draft fiscal analysis as well.  Once drafted and approved by the requisite members of each committee, bills are then presented to the Legislative Council (leadership of both chambers) for final approval prior to introduction in January.

At the Water Resources Review Committee today, Rep. Dylan Roberts requested that staff draft a version of HB 18-1301, which he sponsored last session and saw defeated in the Senate.  There has been no discussion of mining related issues or other presentations that would lay the groundwork for this bill in the Interim. He referred to it as necessary to provide monitoring and protecting water quality for future mining operations.  The committee will consider whether to recommend the draft as an Interim Committee sponsored bill at its Sept. 27 meeting.

An interim study committee to explore alternatives to dealing with the Gallagher Amendment to the state constitution (holding residential property assessments to a ratio of non-residential) and the interplay with TABOR continues to meet.  Previous meetings were held at the Capitol July 13 and in Glenwood Springs July 18.  The committee will meet again in Pueblo August 17, and at the Capitol August 21 and October 3.

Pursuant to HJR 18-1021, the Legislature will convene January 4 in 2019 on a Friday instead of the usual Wednesday start date.  Following the November 6 General Election, newly elected legislators will begin orientation in three phases:  November 9, December 3-5, and Dec. 17-18.   The earlier start date means that, under the amended Joint Rules, three of the returning f members’ allotted five bill requests must be filed by November 26.  New legislators have until December 10 to request three of their 5 bills. 

People on the Move

Mike Silverstein, Administrator for the Air Quality Control Commission, will leave CDPHE to become Executive Director of the Denver Regional Air Quality Council (RAQC) at the end of August, replacing Ken Lloyd who is retiring.  Silverstein has been with the department both at the Air Pollution Control Division and the Commission since.  Steven McCannon will serve as Temporary Interim Executive Director pending Silverstein’s arrival.

Dr. Larry Wolk, Executive Director of the CDPHE, will leave the agency at the end of August to take a job in California.  Until a new department head is appointed (likely after the new Administration is in place) Deputy Director Karin McGowan will serve as Interim Director.

Gary Baughman, Director of Hazardous Materials and Waste Management at CDPHE, has retired and is replaced by Jennifer Opila, former Radiation Program Manager.  The Governor has appointed Stephen Wayne Laramore of Craig, to serve on the Coal Mine Board of Examiners as a coal mine owner, operator, manager, or other mine official actively engaged in surface mining For a term expiring July 1, 2022. 

David Ludlam, Executive Director of West Slope COGA (Colorado Oil and Gas Association) left that position become head of public relations  for Colorado Mesa University on August 1. His successor has not yet been named.  In Case You Missed It:  Shortly after the legislature adjourned the Governor announced the appointment of the following individuals to the Water Quality Control Commission for terms expiring February 15, 2021:

  • Joan Card of Boulder, appointed;
  • Richard Clark Hum of Nathrop, reappointed;
  • Troy Glen Waters of Fruita, appointed. 

CMA Committee Updates 

Coal, Hardrock and Uranium Committee

CMA’s Coal, Hardrock and Uranium Committees meet jointly each month and provide members the opportunity to not only keep up to date on policy issues CMA is working on, but also the chance to interact with other CMA members. We find engagement among members at CMA meetings to be especially beneficial at these meetings.   At the August meeting we were fortunate to have two representatives of the EPA Region 8 in attendance.   Patrick Davis, senior advisor for public engagement to the EPA region 8 regional administrator in Denver, made brief comments about EPA’s Smart Sectors Program an effort by the agency to collect comments about how EPA can work more collaboratively with selected industries. Mining, oil and gas, agricultural industries and outdoor tourism are the areas of focus for region 8. View links to summary documents of the Smart Sectors Program meeting presentations in both Colorado and Montana.

Joy Jenkins, remedial project manager for EPA region 8, briefed CMA members about EPA’s efforts to understand tools created in guidance documents in 2007 and 2012 designed to expedite cleanups of abandoned mines. Joy mentioned EPA’s participation at the MMSA Good Samaritan seminar in April which generated ideas for the agency’s future consideration. EPA has recently engaged in demonstration projects and certain “dirt” projects that don’t involve water treatment.  The committees discussed a number of items related to Colorado’s air quality and water quality programs as they affect mining and general industry sectors. Both the Air Pollution Control Division and Water Quality Control Division have stakeholder processes intended to provide feedback from permittees and the public regarding efficiencies and programmatic issues discussed during legislative consideration of funding of the two Divisions.   CMA is actively participating in the Air Pollution Division’s Stationary Source Control Fund Stakeholder process in conjunction with the Colorado Association of Commerce and Industry. The stakeholder process is intended to:

  • Assess improvements in efficiency for activities funded by the fees.
  • Identify and assess measures to improve billing practices and increase transparency of accounting practices.

CMA is hosting bi-weekly conference calls to update members about the meetings and get direction from members so that we can fully participate in the process. A link to the Division’s webpage that provides information and updates about the stakeholder process can be found here.

As Dianna Orf has covered in her report, another stakeholder group CMA is engaged in is the CDPHE TENORM Regulation Development Stakeholder process which will convene a stakeholder group to discuss the development of rules and the impact TENORM rules might have on various industries. 
Activities related to this process include:

  • Review TENORM residual management and regulatory limits from other states
  • Prepare a report that considers background radiation levels in the state, waste stream identification and quantification, use and disposal practices, current engineering practices, appropriate test methods, economic impacts and data gaps
  • Develop a proposed residuals management rule based on the report
  • At our July meeting, Jennifer Opila, newly named director of the Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division, visited with our committee and explicitly requested CMA send a letter as a part of the stakeholder process stating CMA believes the definition of TENORM not include soils simply moved as a part of the mining process. CMA anticipates aggressive efforts to broaden the definition of TENORM by entities who testified for expansive regulations during legislative debate, and those wishing to limit the number of facilities defined as TENORM. The link to the Division’s TENORM stakeholder webpage can be found here.
  • David Berry, regional director of the Western Regional Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE), will speak at our September committee meeting. 
Water Quality Committee

CThe CMA Water Quality Committee meets monthly to discuss a number of state and federal water quality issues. CMA’s Water Quality Committee chairman, Jimmy Boswell of Peabody Energy, and committee members have prepared issue papers covering topics the committee has discussed for several years. Members of the committee may view these papers in the document library, here. Interested in joining the committee? Go to the Water Quality Committee group page and click “Join Group” at the top of the page.

In July, the committee hosted a meeting with the Colorado Water Quality Control Division where issues identified by members such as permit conditions and water quality standards were discussed. Many of the issues covered are also discussed in the Permit Issues Work Group.   

 

Water quality issues for CMA’s mining operators have proven to be difficult to resolve, though CMA provides a forum for members to work together to share ideas, strategies and experiences. We are pleased to be able to assist our members in collectively working with Colorado regulators in the Division of Mining and Safety as well as the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s Water Quality Control Division (WQCD). 


Finally, CMA provides comments to regulators on a wide variety of subjects of concern, including support of individual members who wish to have comments filed expressing a general industry viewpoint supporting a company’s legal, policy or technical position. For example, CMA has filed comments with the WQCD supporting Trapper Mining Company and Colowyo Mine in their water quality permit renewal applications.

Awards

This year CMA is proud to announce that all of our awards have been updated to reflect progression of the mining industry. This includes our Environmental Sustainability Awards, Mine Health and Safety Awards, and the Coal and Hardrock Reclamation Awards. Exceptional performers will be recognized for their achievements at CMA’s awards ceremonies during the annual conference, February 24-27, 2019. Applications for 2018 nominations are now being accepted! Deadline for all applications is December 1, 2018. Click here to learn more about updates and to apply!

Scholarships 

The Colorado Mining Association is excited to offer collegiate students in Colorado the opportunity to apply for a $500 scholarship for the 2019 spring semester. Through the generous support of our member companies, CMA will distribute up to three $500 scholarships to applicants who not only meet the criteria, but are working towards improving environmentally sustainable practices. Submissions are due December 1, 2018. Click here for more information.

 

 

Colorado Mining Association Education Foundation’s “All About Mining” K-12 Teachers Course Celebrates It’s 50th Anniversary With A Mineral Education Award. 

Earlier this spring, the Interstate Mining Compact Commission (IMCC) selected CMAEF’s course, “All About Mining: 21st Century Mining for K-12 Educators” as the winner of its 2018 Mineral Education Award in the Public Outreach category. The IMCC is a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental protection interests of its member states.

 

This award recognizes CMAEF’s course for achieving excellence in providing educational outreach that increases the level of understanding about mining in the classroom or community.      The award was presented to CMAEF’s Course Coordinator Shannon Mann and Past Chairman Paul Jones at the 2018 Annual IMCC Meeting in April in Charlotte, North Carolina.

 

The IMCC stated, “It is a pleasure to recognize the creative and innovative mineral education program that Colorado Mining Association Education Foundation has developed and grown to reach teachers and students not only within the 50 United States, but also across the globe. Your nomination is representative of a commitment to educate the public about mining and minerals and will reap future benefits in the way of a better understanding of mineral use and production, necessary environmental controls, and the resulting impacts on society. Keep up the good work”.   

 

The “All About Mining” course has been providing an immersive and comprehensive educational experience for teachers for 50 years. It was originally developed in cooperation with the Colorado School of Mines and the Colorado Mining Association. Since 1968, over 1,550 educators from all 50 states and several foreign countries have experienced the course and gone on to spread the knowledge gained within their communities.

 

The CMAEF thanks all who have worked so diligently through the years to make this course what it is today. We also thank the IMCC for recognizing these efforts, and the Colorado Division of Reclamation, Mining and Safety for nominating us.

 

For more information about “All About Mining: 21st Century Mining for K-12 Educators”, please contact Shannon Mann, coordinator@allaboutmining.org or visit our website, www.allaboutmining.org.    

 

Upcoming Events

September 6, 2018
Board of Directors Meeting
8:30am-1:00pm | Trapper Mine, Craig CO

September 20, 2018
Water Quality Committee Meeting
9:00am-10:00am | CMA Office (suite 860)
RSVP (Members Only)

September 20, 2018
Coal, Hardrock and Uranium Committee Meeting
10:30am-12:30pm | CMA Office (suite 860) RSVP
(Members Only)

February 24-27, 2019 2019 SME Annual Conference & Expo and CMA 121st National Western Mining Conference
Registration opens in October. 

Sign up for the latest updates on conference registration, news, updates promotions and more!

CMA Career Center

Connecting highly qualified mining talent with career opportunities!


CMA is proud to announce our new Career Center—the premier resource to connect career opportunities with highly qualified mining talent. To access the CMA Career Center, visit here. 

 

Manage Your Career:

  • Search and apply to the best mining jobs at institutions that value your credentials
  • Upload your anonymous resume so employers can contact you, but you maintain control of your information and choose to whom you release your information.
  • Receive an alert every time a job becomes available that matches your personal profile, skills, interests, and preferred location(s).
  • Access career resources and job searching tips and tools. 

Recruit for Open Positions:

  • Post jobs where the most qualified mining professionals will find and apply to them.
  • Email your jobs directly to CMA job seekers via our exclusive Job Flash email.
  • Search the resume database and contact qualified candidates proactively.
 

 

Questions? Feedback? If you need assistance about this service call us at 860-437-5700 or email customer service.

 

Advertise in CMA’s Rock & Coal Newsletter

Rock & Coal provides the latest mining industry news to the region’s mining operators and suppliers. The monthly e-newsletter provides access to decision-makers and senior executives who rely on industry trends and timely news to make smart decisions.


Highly Engaged Audience
As the industry’s advocate before state and federal legislatures, regulatory agencies and the media on matters critical to the health of the industry, CMA utilizes Rock & Coal to get the message out about the latest legal and policy issues. The newsletter is also the premier source of news and updates on member organizations and CMA activities and events. 

Measurable Performance
Advertising in Rock & Coal provides measurable tracking information. We’ll let you know how many people (and who) saw your ad and clicked on your link so you know exactly how much exposure you’re getting.

 

August 2018

 

Your Contribution to CMA's Political Committees is Important to the Future of Mining in Colorado

In case you haven’t noticed, the 2018 Colorado election season is in full swing! CMA needs your help in electing candidates to the Colorado General Assembly that support mining in Colorado.


Colorado will be electing a new Governor and Attorney General this fall, as well as a number of new legislators to the Colorado House and Senate. The candidates for Governor and Attorney General have already expressed starkly differing views of their vision for Colorado’s energy future. Jared Polis, Democratic candidate for Governor, promises that by 2040 Colorado will generate 100% of its electricity from renewable sources.

Mining for Colorado’s Future (CMA’s Political Action Committee) and the Colorado Mining Association Small Donor Committee are two ways you can financially support candidates who support Colorado’s mining industry. Your contribution of $50 to the Colorado Mining Association Small Donor Committee combined with other member contributions allows CMA to contribute up to $2,000 to a legislative candidate. Mining for Colorado’s Future can accept up to $575 per election cycle from both corporations and individuals. Candidates running for the General Assembly can accept $400 ($200 for the primary election and $200 for the general election).

During the last two legislative sessions, Republicans in the State Senate defeated bills passed by House Democrats, which prohibited new hardrock mining in Colorado, prematurely closed coal fired electric power plants and imposed new carbon reduction goals.

National environmental leader Tom Steyer, who has spent millions of dollars in past elections, and organizations such as Conservation Colorado have big plans to deploy massive resources in Colorado in order to seize control of the Colorado Senate for Democrats who will pass anti-mining legislation for Jared Polis to sign if elected Governor.

It is imperative that CMA members support candidates who support mining in Colorado by contributing to the Colorado Mining Association’s Small Donor Committee or Mining for Colorado’s Future. If Jared Polis is elected Governor along with a legislature completely controlled by legislators who endorse environmental policy recommendations developed by Conservation Colorado, mining in Colorado will face a difficult future.

Please make your contribution to either of CMA’s committees by completing the appropriate form:


Mining for Colorado’s Future Political Committee, LLC

Colorado Mining Association Small Donor Committee

 

Federal and State Government News

Hold onto your hats (and wallets)—campaigns are underway!

If you have been watching your mailbox and observing the young people standing around grocery stores holding clipboards, you have probably figured out that we are entering an election cycle. The 2018 General Election will be held November 6 to elect a new Governor, State Treasurer, Secretary of State, Attorney General, members of the Colorado House of Representatives (all 65), half of the state Senate, and assorted other state and local officials. 

Candidates are seeking financial contributions to run their campaigns and votes from registered electors in their respective districts. The June 26 primary election weeded out several potential candidates to determine who would be the face of the two major political parties on the November ballot. In addition, in several districts minor party candidates such as Libertarian, Green Party, and Independent candidates (not affiliated with a party) will also appear.

CMA has participated with other statewide business organizations in interviewing candidates to identify those who support mining or are open to learning more about our industry.  We will continue to talk with these candidates prior to the election and work with them (should they win) to provide a better appreciation for the role mining plays in Colorado’s economy.   

Newly-elected legislators will get a look at the Capitol and preview their new offices on November 9 when they begin orientation. Phase 2 of that process is scheduled for Dec. 3-5 and Phase 3 takes place Dec. 17-18. SURPRISE! This year the legislative session convene Friday, January 4, a departure from previous years with a later mid-week start date.

 

Ballot Initiatives Matter

 

In addition to a lengthy list of candidates, the ballot may see several proposed changes (both statutory and constitutional amendments). 

Two competing initiatives address transportation funding. Initiative #153 calls for an increase in the state’s sales and use tax from 2.9% to 3.52% for a period of 20 years. Initiative 167 (Fix our damn roads) requires CDOT to issue transportation bonds to construct and maintain roads and bridges (no transit) without increasing taxes.

Oil and gas issues also present competing measures. Initiative #97 requires a 2500-foot setback for all new oil/gas facilities from occupied structures and “vulnerable areas”, effectively sterilizing more than three quarters of private land in the state. Initiative 108 amends the state constitution to require compensation for any diminution in fair market value resulting from governmental action. Initiatives #178-181 basically restate existing law with regard to property rights and local government authority over oil/gas operations.  Initiative #97 is drawing the most attention (and concern) because of the potentially devastating effect on Colorado’s economy both in terms of lost jobs and revenues to state and local governments. Controversy also surrounds one firm circulating petitions that has reportedly left the state over disputed bill payments. Learn more.

 

Legislators Looking to the Future

 

Although it seems that the legislature just adjourned, in fact it has been eleven weeks and plans are underway for the 2019 session. With the question of which political party controls the two chambers and the Governor’s office up in the air until November 6 (and maybe a few days afterward), draft legislation is being formulated by interest groups, interim legislative committees, and stakeholders. 

The Water Resources Review Committee has begun its cycle of interim meetings to receive briefings on a wide range of topics related to water rights, water quality, and watershed protection. Meetings are scheduled for August 6-7 at the Capitol and again August 23 at the fall Colorado Water Congress conference in Vail. 

An interim committee devoted to studying alternatives to the Gallagher Amendment (property tax ratio) met at the Capitol and in Glenwood Springs, and is planning additional meetings in Pueblo (Aug. 17), and at the Capitol August 21 and Oct. 3.  The committee is exploring potential solutions to the loss of revenue for local governments and special districts resulting from a disproportionate ratio between residential and non-residential real property. Little can be done absent constitutional amendment.
Individual legislators who are returning (for example, Senators who are not up for re-election) are also meeting with stakeholders to discuss issues of particular interest such as health care.

 

New Regulations Coming Out of State Agencies

 

CDPHE held the first stakeholder meeting to plan for TENORM regulations on July 11. Future meetings are being delayed until a contractor is hired by the department to work with the rule development, likely in September. Initial efforts will be focused on receiving public comment concerning areas of discussion set forth in authorizing statute including setting an exempt level; setting regulatory limits for landfill disposal; setting regulatory limits for beneficial reuse; setting regulatory limits for radioactive materials licensing; implementing limits/levels; other issues identified by the stakeholders. Public comment is being accepted from August 1 through Oct. 31. Comments should be sent to Jennifer Opila.

 

The Air Quality Control Commission anticipates a request for proposed rulemaking on California Vehicle Standards (low emission vehicle) requirements for Colorado at is August meeting. At the July meeting Tesla representatives touted Zero Emission Vehicles (zev) as well.  The Commission has discussed the issue during the past couple of years, but the Governor’s recent Executive Order gave new strength to the Commission’s desire to move toward a California-type program.

 

Washington News

 

Changes proposed for Endangered Species.  At the US Fish and Wildlife Serivce (FWS) three proposed rules published in the July 25 Federal Register address procedures and criteria for listing species as threatened or endangered, for designating critical habitat and the procedures for inter-agency (Section 7) consultation, among others. A 60-day public comment period will end September 24, 2018.

 

Safety Improvement Technologies for Mobile Equipment at Surface Mines, and for Belt Conveyors at Surface and Underground Mines

Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revision of the Regulations for Listing Species and Designating Critical Habitat

Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revision of the Regulations for Prohibitions to Threatened Wildlife and Plants

 

In Congress, Rep. Scott Tipton (R-CO) has introduced H.R. 6344 to amend the Endangered Species Act to allow the federal government to work with private landowners on voluntary conservation measures and reimburse them for their costs.

Also in the July 25 Federal Register, MSHA announced six public stakeholder meetings concerning Safety Improvement Technologies for Mobile Equipment at Surface Mines and for Belt Conveyors at Surface and Underground Mines. The location closest to Colorado is Reno, Nevada with a meeting scheduled at 9 am August 21. MSHA will also host a webinar August 16. Comments will be received by the agency until December 24, 2018. Learn more.


Update from the Coal, Hardrock and Uranium Committees

CMA’s Coal, Hardrock and Uranium Committees meet monthly in a combined committee meeting. During those meetings we receive updates from the Division of Reclamation, Mining and Safety covering both the coal and hardrock mining programs. At the July meeting, the Division updated members about recent revisions being considered to Reclamation Cost Estimates and electronic permitting.

Steven Lange of Knight Piesold presented a summary of reclamation activities near Silverton conducted by Sunnyside Gold Corporation. Sunnyside Gold Corporation engaged in more than 30 years of reclamation and remediation in the Silverton Caldera. Actions included removal of mine waste from owned and area mines, treatment of water discharged from mine portals, seasonal treatment of the flow in Cement Creek, installation of bulkheads in mine workings and stabilization of tailings deposits. Learn more.

Committee meetings also allow member companies to inform other CMA members of activities at their mines, and we had an excellent update from Kathy Welt of Mountain Coal Company who updated the committee about the tour the company conducted as a part of a petition filed by Wild Earth Guardians challenging aspects of the mine’s reclamation efforts. 

Jennifer Opila of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment updated CMA members about the Department’s stakeholder process convened for the purpose of gathering input into promulgation of rules and regulations pertaining to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (TENORM). Senate Bill 245, passed in the last legislative session, provides authority to the Department to adopt rules covering TENORM. The stakeholder process can be followed here. CMA will be participating in the stakeholder process with the intent of limiting the types of mining related activities covered by the rules. Dianna Orf provided CMA members a complete summary of this issue in her Governmental Affairs Report.

 

Update from the Water Quality Committee

View the summary from committee chair, Jimmy Boswell, here.


CMA Career Center

Connecting highly qualified mining talent with career opportunities
CMA is proud to announce our new Career Center—the premier resource to connect career opportunities with highly qualified mining talent. To access the CMA Career Center, visit here. 

 

Manage Your Career:

  • Search and apply to the best mining jobs at institutions that value your credentials
  • Upload your anonymous resume so employers can contact you, but you maintain control of your information and choose to whom you release your information.
  • Receive an alert every time a job becomes available that matches your personal profile, skills, interests, and preferred location(s).
  • Access career resources and job searching tips and tools. 

Recruit for Open Positions:

  • Post jobs where the most qualified mining professionals will find and apply to them.
  • Email your jobs directly to CMA job seekers via our exclusive Job Flash email.
  • Search the resume database and contact qualified candidates proactively.
 

 

Questions? Feedback? If you need assistance about this service call us at 860-437-5700 or email customer service.

All About Mining’s 2018 Summer Course for K-12 Teachers: A Rock-Solid Success!

The Colorado Mining Association Education Foundation (CMAEF) annual All About Mining course took place in June, providing 16 teachers with eight spectacular days of information-packed classes and tours to various Colorado sites.

This annual program, which was originally launched back in 1968, begins with a refresher of lectures on the Colorado School of Mines campus, with a few local tours such as Hazen Research Laboratory, CSM’s Geology Museum and the Earth Mechanics Institute.  The third day features a trip to CSM’s Edgar Mine in Idaho Springs, where teachers learn about mine safety and take their first trip into a mine.  On the fourth day, we board a bus and begin a five-day adventure visiting an aggregate mine, a steel facility, an open pit gold mine, an open pit molybdenum mine, a wall board facility and mine, an in-situ nacolite mine, an open pit coal mine and generation facility and an underground coal mine.  It is an amazing tour that gives the teachers a chance to see first hand what makes a mine or mill facility work, to ask questions of the operators and get the real story, and most importantly, come away with a true and insightful understanding of the industry that they can share with their students.  Comments from this year’s teachers included:

 

 

“This opened my eyes to how much we use and need minerals every day!”

“A once in a lifetime experience”

“The Tours were amazing, the instruction great. I wish more people could experience this opportunity, I learned so much!”

“I was impressed with the technology involved - much more than I expected”

 

All About Mining is a one of a kind course that culminates with six hours of continuing education credits from CSM that enables upward mobility for the teacher.  It is also 100% supported by industry and people like you.  We hope that you will consider a donation to CMAEF’s All About Mining course and help us continue this good work!

 

Shannon Mann

Course Coordinator

coordinator@allaboutmining.org

 

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12/11/2018
2018 St. Barbara's Day Award Luncheon

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