CMA News Release: STATEMENT OF THE COLORADO MINING ASSOCIATION ON HARDROCK MINING & RECLAMATION ACT OF 2015



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November 10, 2015

Contact: Stuart Sanderson, ssanderson@coloradomining.org

STATEMENT OF THE COLORADO MINING ASSOCIATION ON HARDROCK MINING & RECLAMATION ACT OF 2015

            The Colorado Mining Association (CMA) issued the following statement in response to the introduction of S. 796, the Hardrock Mining & Reclamation Act of 2015.

CMA President Stuart Sanderson said the proposed legislation “is not constructive and doesn’t provide workable solutions associated with abandoned historic mines that operated prior to the era of modern mining regulation. Today’s mines, by contrast, are heavily regulated and closely monitored.”   “Congress should focus on removing the disincentives and obstacles to Good Samaritan mining cleanup projects imposed by the Clean Water Act and other laws, rather than impose punitive and unsustainable royalties that will only kill investment, jobs, national expertise, and local revenue generated by modern mineral development and production in the US.”

“If anything is apparent from the Animas River spill and the EPA’s actions which caused it,” Sanderson said, “it is that bigger bureaucracy alone – without the partnership and input of communities and industry — does not work.” Modern mining in Colorado and throughout the United States is conducted under a robust system of laws and regulations that ensure the protection of public health, safety and the environment. “The nation needs legislation that would help tap the expertise and 21st century technologies employed by modern mines to clean up these historic mining sites, not saddle current operators which are not part of the problem with excessive royalties or costly new requirements that duplicate existing programs.” CMA said.   In other words, Sanderson said, “Fix what’s broken; don’t break what works.”

About the Colorado Mining Association

The Colorado Mining Association is a trade association established in 1876 and incorporated in 1897. Its 1,000 members include individuals and companies that explore for, mine and refine coal, metals, oil shale and industrial minerals, firms that manufacture and distribute mining and mineral processing equipment and supplies; and other entities providing services and supplies to the mineral industry. The CMA, headquartered in Denver, serves as a spokesman for the mining industry in Colorado.